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Galaxies

Andromeda Galaxy

As each slider bar is manipulated, the view transitions from visible light to infrared light. In visible light: This is the classic visible view of the Andromeda Galaxy. In infrared light: Andromeda's dust rings stand out in the infrared. As each slider bar is manipulated, the view transitions from visible light to infrared light. In visible light: This is the classic visible view of the Andromeda Galaxy. In infrared light: Andromeda's dust rings stand out in the infrared.
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Infrared:
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Andromeda Galaxy

Andromeda is the nearest spiral galaxy to the Milky Way, around 2.5 million light-years away. Once thought to be a twin of our galaxy, its different structure is very evident in infrared light. While it is a spiral galaxy, its dust falls largely in a huge ring structure, possibly caused by gravitational interactions with its smaller satellite galaxies.
Visible: This is the classic visible view of the Andromeda Galaxy.
Infrared: Andromeda's dust rings stand out in the infrared.
CREDITS: Visible: NOAO/AURA/NSF. Infrared: NASA/JPL-Caltech/K. Gordon (University of Arizona).