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Exoplanet

Myth vs Reality: Observing Planets

 This short video addresses the misconception that planets can only be seen in visual light.

Credits

Exoplanets
 
Produced by the Space Telescope Science Institute’s Office of Public Outreach.
 
All images, illustrations, and videos courtesy of NASA except:
 
·       Illustration of planets orbiting a red dwarf courtesy of ESO
·       Illustration montage of exoplanets courtesy of C. Pulliam & D. Aguilar (CfA)
·       Taurus constellation drawing from Firmamentum Sobiescianum sive Uranographia by Johannes Hevelius, courtesy of the United States Naval Observatory
·       Image of solar spectrum courtesy of N.A. Sharp, NOAO/NSO/Kitt Peak FTS/AURA/NSF
·       Animation of planets orbiting star HD 10180 courtesy of ESO/L. Calçada
·       Animation of transiting planet and light curve courtesy of G. Bacon and B. Preston (STScI)
·       Animation of transiting planet with spectrum courtesy of G. Bacon, B. Preston, and J. Godfrey (STScI)
·       Ariane 5 rocket launch image ©2008 ESA – CNES – Arianespace/Photo by Optique Video CSG
·       James Webb Space Telescope animation courtesy of G. Bacon (STScI)
·       Protoplanetary disk animation courtesy of ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO)/L. Calçada (ESO)/M. Kornmesser (ESO)/Nick Risinger (skysurvey.org)/Digitized Sky Survey 2
·       Animation of disk and planet around Beta Pictoris courtesy of ESO/L. Calçada
·       James Webb Space Telescope illustration courtesy of G. Bacon (STScI)/Northrop Grumman
·       Animation of HD 189733 b’s atmosphere courtesy of ESA/Hubble (M. Kornmesser & L. L. Christensen)
·       Animation of planet transiting a star courtesy of ESO/L. Calçada
·       Absorption spectrum diagram courtesy of A. Feild (STScI)
·       Illustration of exoplanet OGLE-TR-L9 b courtesy of ESO/H. Zodet
·       Water, carbon dioxide, and methane molecule animations courtesy of G. Bacon (STScI)
·       Emission spectrum of a planet courtesy of J. Godfrey (STScI)
·       Animation of exoplanet GJ 1214 b courtesy of ESO/L. Calçada
 
 
Written by Vanessa Thomas
Designed by John Godfrey
Music courtesy of Association Production Music

Transcript

(SPEECH) 
 [ELECTRONIC MUSIC] 


(DESCRIPTION) 
 Top left, a black and white picture of a minotaur. Top right, a color picture of a planet. 


Text, MYTH versus REALITY 


Myth side 


Text, Planets can be seen only in visible light. 


Reality side 


Text, Planets are actually easier to see in infrared light than in visible light. The glare of a planet's host star is typically more muted in infrared light. And while planets do not give off visible light of their own, but only reflect their star's light, they do radiate in infrared light. These two factors make planets appear brighter at infrared wavelengths.